1. 10:00 - 15:00 Brandon Leigh
  2. 15:00 - 19:00 Tim Thabethe

On Thursday John Maytham chatted to caller Michelle who bemoaned not being able to get her child into a Brackenfell school.

Homeschooling was mooted as an alternative and then cottage schooling was thrown into the mox.

Take a listen as John speaks to home education curriculum author, consultant and activist Shirley Erwee about cottage schooling.

Read: Brackenfell mom at wits end, says schools are chockablock

Unlike homeschooling, a cottage school would be where a group of children gathers at a venue and receives education together from one or more teachers.

Home education is in the child's own home, and cottage school would be at another venue.

Shirley Erwee, home education curriculum author, consultant and activist

While there are no formal statistics, Erwee says within the homeschooling network, the phenomenon of cottage schools is mushrooming.

Because there are so many parents who are just not happy with the state of mainstream schooling and so they are looking for alternatives for their children.

Shirley Erwee, home education curriculum author, consultant and activist

She says these parents are finding small places where their children receive tuition in a group and also have social interaction with other kids and be offered a more personalised alternative to the school system.

Erwee says the numbers of pupils vary from 2 to 80, which she describes as an unregistered independent school.

Cottage schools are not legal technically.

The problem is that the requirements for registration are sometimes completely impractical and unrealistic and expensive for a small school.

Shirley Erwee, home education curriculum author, consultant and activist

Take a listen to how it works:

More on KFM