1. 09:00 - 12:00 Tracey Lange
  2. 12:00 - 15:00 Ryan O'Connor

Microblogging social networking service Twitter has urged its more than 330 million users to change their passwords.

This comes after Twitter discovered a glitch that caused some passwords to be stored in readable text on its internal computer system.

According to Twitter, an internal investigation had found no indication passwords were stolen or misused by insiders.

The social network claims it has resolved the problem, but still urges all users to consider changing their passwords.

Tech expert Toby Shapshak commended Twitter for proactively informing users about the breach.

Shapshak says internet users should avoid using the same password on multiple platforms.

Shapshak advises that users should opt for a secure password manager to keep log-in details safe.

Meanwhile, tech expert Jan Vermeulen says social media users should not take internet security for granted.

Vermeulen supports the use of a secure password manager and makes other recommendations.

Most people don't seem to understand how important their passwords are and they use the same passwords for multiple services. That's why Twitter is warning people.

Toby Shapshak, Stuff magazine editor-in-chief

You should never have the same password and you should never have a password that is obvious or simple.

Toby Shapshak, Stuff magazine editor-in-chief

Password managers are the way to go.

Toby Shapshak, Stuff magazine editor-in-chief

Twitter says they don't see any breach.

Toby Shapshak, Stuff magazine editor-in-chief

You need to treat the internet like you would any platform where their details are exposed, like a banking platform.

Jan Vermeulen, Technology Editor at MyBroadband

Take care of your personal data as you do your financial information.

Jan Vermeulen, Technology Editor at MyBroadband

Take a listen to Stuff magazine editor-in-chief Toby Shapshak's views:

Take a listen to MyBroadband's Jan Vermeulen:

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Reset your password, Twitter warns (and advice on how to keep it secure)

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