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Adolescence can be a tough time for young girls.

A local programme helps mothers guide their tweens and teens through their adolescent experiences.

Also read: Book explores violent masculinity and tough life choices young men face

The project empowers young girls to develop resilience to cope with the challenges thrown their way, particularly if they face girl on girl bulling.

The programme is for mothers and daughters and it’s called CHATT - Conversations Happening all the Time.

Read: Signs your child is being bullied (and how parents, schools can help)

The range of workshops include sessions on cyber bullying, puberty and sexuality and healthy life choices.

The co-founders of CHATT , Pam Tudin and Ashley Hurwitz share their expert advice and explore the different archetypes in girl friendship groups.

We have to be very careful because 'bully' is a very heavy label to walk around with.

Pam Tudin, clinical psychologist and parent/child educator

If it happens over time repeatedly, and the person hasn't stopped. Then there's intention and that when you can begin to label a bully.

Pam Tudin, clinical psychologist and parent/child educator

Girl bullying is much more subtle than that. Girls connect through intimacy and also share their disdain.

Pam Tudin, clinical psychologist and parent/child educator

I'm a mom of twin girls who are 10 years old... I approached Pam and with the idea of creating a programme for moms and daughter to talk about various issues.

Ashley Hurwitz, transformational change consultant and facilitator

The conversations need to start happening before they reach that stage where they push their mons away to help understand what they are going to face.

Ashley Hurwitz, transformational change consultant and facilitator

Listen to the insightful discussion during the Family Matters feature:

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Project helps moms and young girls beat bullying and 'mean girl' culture

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