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It seems that hadedas are increasing their footprint across South Africa.

The noisy birds appear to have flocked to the Western Cape region, says zoology expert Preshnee Singh.

Also read: World of Birds sanctuary faces shut down

Singh is a research assistant at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's School of Life Sciences and wrote her Masters thesis on the bird.

Tall garden trees provide nesting for the birds and the lawns are perfect for foraging in addition to rubbish bins and pet food.

I looked at the urban ecology of hadedas.

Preshnee Singh, Research Assistant at School of Life Sciences at UKZN

It seems their population has been increasing and their range possibly expanded they way it has.

Preshnee Singh, Research Assistant at School of Life Sciences at UKZN

The way that urban areas are designed seems to support hadedas.

Preshnee Singh, Research Assistant at School of Life Sciences at UKZN

We've found quite a lot of hadedas foraging in rubbish bins and they've been eating dog food as well.

Preshnee Singh, Research Assistant at School of Life Sciences at UKZN

The birds are very adaptable and they get used to the urban situation.

Preshnee Singh, Research Assistant at School of Life Sciences at UKZN

Listen to her expert findings on the urban concentration of hadedas:

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Why there seem to be more hadedas in your neighbourhood than before

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