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Cape Town club-goers have been warned to be extra cautious on nights out.

Human rights organisation Triangle Project has issued a warning following at least two incidents of spiked drinks that led to sexual assaults.

The Triangle Project's Sharon Cox says the recent cases occurred in venues in the Cape Town CBD and Parow.

She explains that the drugs used in spiked drinks are often undetectable to the victim.

She's urging revellers to watch over their drinks and be weary of strangers offering free ones.

Cox says Rohypnol, also known as the date rape drug, is a commonly used drug to spike drinks.

Heroin, cocaine, Valium, and other sedatives, as well as eye drops, are known to have been used.

Symptoms include blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, impaired balance, diarrhoea, sudden intoxication, weak legs.

She has urged others not to put their friends at risk by leaving them unattended or by allowing them to disappear with unknown people.

According to Cox, drinks are generally spiked with the intention of robbery or rape.

She advises that victims get to a hospital or medical doctor within 12 and 72 hours of the incident for urine and blood tests.

It's also important to go to the police station and open a criminal case, she adds.

Both incidents were textbook spiking, two people had been enjoying a night out and had drinks.

Sharon Cox, Health and Support Services Manager at the Triangle Project

Within half an hour, both reported feeling dizzy,.. and not well and then blacking out.

Sharon Cox, Health and Support Services Manager at the Triangle Project

In both cases, they woke up in unfamiliar surroundings, with absolutely no memory of how they got there. One was left naked and the other had access to their clothes.

Sharon Cox, Health and Support Services Manager at the Triangle Project

Spiking someone's drink is a criminal offence. It's against the law. But sadly, not many people report these crimes.

Sharon Cox, Health and Support Services Manager at the Triangle Project

People who spike drinks don't do it for harm. The intention is either to rob or to rape.

Sharon Cox, Health and Support Services Manager at the Triangle Project

Listen to the conversation on The Pippa Hudson Show:

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : CT clubbers warned to watch out for spiked drinks after two sexual assault cases

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