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Cape Town dam levels have reached 80.3% in August, a far cry from the low levels of two years ago when the city faced one of its biggest crisis.

Media liaison officer for the Western Cape Minister of Local Government and Environmental Affairs James Brent Styan talks to Kieno Kammies.

Two years ago the average dam levels were about 29% at this time. Today as we speak, the average dam level across the Western Cape is 65% - so about three times higher.

James Brent Styan, Media liaison officer - W Cape Minister of Local Government and Environmental Affairs

The figures hold across most of the province.

Clanwilliam Dam is full, they have opened the sluices there. That is up on the West Coast, probably the second biggest dam in the province.

James Brent Styan, Media liaison officer - W Cape Minister of Local Government and Environmental Affairs

The Karoo, the interior portion of the province, however, is under pressure, he says.

Some farmers still haven't seen a drop of rain.

James Brent Styan, Media liaison officer - W Cape Minister of Local Government and Environmental Affairs

The biggest dam in the province, the biggest supplier to Cape Town, Theewaterskloof, currently stands at 70% full. In January 2018 it was below 10%.

The dams feeding the City of Cape Town with water's levels are averaging 80%, even higher than the provincial average.

James Brent Styan, Media liaison officer - W Cape Minister of Local Government and Environmental Affairs

He urges citizens to continue saving water.

Water restrictions will be reconsidered in November, he says.

Listen to the interview with James Brent Styan below:

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Cape dams: Theewaterskloof currently 70% full, was below 10% in January 2018

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