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Wits professor Mike Muller says officials should have panicked over water shortages at least three years ago and that the business community must help resolve the matter.

Dam levels in Cape Town have declined to 24,1% (storage levels), which is 1% down from a week ago.

At least 10% the dam’s water is not usable, effectively leaving dam levels at 14,1%.

There was a project to take more water out Berg into Voelvlei dam which is still going to happen, and that was, in fact, the first easy thing to do, That should have been done before all these others. The point is, Cape Town has quite a lot of options but people were taking their eye off the ball.

Mike Muller, visiting adjunct professor, University of the Witwatersrand

I think what happened is you had a couple of good years of rain in 20102, 2013, all of sudden the demand went down, the City fathers and mothers said 'Oh look how clever we are we are reducing our water use'.

Mike Muller, visiting adjunct professor, University of the Witwatersrand

They didn't' recognise that because it's been raining so much, people weren't watering their gardens as much, so when you have a hot summer, all of a sudden people start watering gardens again, consumption goes back right up to what it used to be and you are caught short.

Mike Muller, visiting adjunct professor, University of the Witwatersrand

Click below to listen to the full interview and how business has gone about the issue the wrong way....

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Water crisis could have been prevented - water expert

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